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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 132 (some duplicates have been removed)
the escalating violence in syria. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez on the "newshour" tonight. we look at the diplomatic stand- off, and the mounting concerns about the syrian government's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: t
. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: recriminations flew at the united nations today after a new push to punish syria came to naught again. as diplomacy failed, a syrian human rights group reported more than 250 people died in fighting across the country and damascus itself slid closer to chaos. >> the security council has failed utterly in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china
evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, tom bearden has the latest from aurora, colorado, where authorities identified the suspect as a 24-year old former neuroscience graduate student who booby-trapped his apartment with explosives. >> he broke in through the door and he threw the thing and, like, all you could see was pretty much the mask, just the gas mask. and it was probably one of the scariest images i've ever seen in my life. >> brown: then, lindsey hilsum of itn updates the war in syria, as tens of thousands of refugees flee the escalating violence. >> suarez: judy woodruff checks in from florida. she reports on the president's push in that battleground state, and the pause in both candidates' campaigns after the colorado shootings. >> brown: and david brooks and e.j. dionne analyze the week's news. >> suarez: a follow-up to our recent story about smart meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to f
. >> suarez: judy woodruff checks in from florida. she reports on the president's push in that battleground state, and the pause in both candidates' campaigns after the colorado shootings. >> brown: and david brooks and e.j. dionne analyze the week's news. >> suarez: a follow-up to our recent story about smart meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to fight a coalition of people who suspect, among other things, that smart meters may be bad for your health. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and b
shows the country's economic recovery is still faltering. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we'll ask supporters of both presidential candidates to explain why today's disappointing numbers mean their man is the best choice to fix the problem. >> woodruff: margaret warner has the latest on an investigation rocking the banking industry, as finance giant barclay's comes under fire for lending rate fixing. >> suarez: lindsey hilsum of independent television news reports from libya where excitement and anxiety build in advance of saturday's historic election. >> for four decades only one was allowed. now thousands of faces look out from billboards across libya. it's almost too much to believe. >> woodruff: david brooks and e.j. dionne analyze the week's news. ♪ ♪ >> suarez: plus, jeffrey brown visits a music festival where up and coming musicians and opera singers study with the greats. >> it's not about you, it's about the full program. it's about getting audiences to enjoy this, to love this as much as we do. >> woodruff: that
the supreme court said about the health care law. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we'll look at how the romney campaign is trying to synchronize its views with those of republican party leaders. >> woodruff: nuclear power returned to the japanese electrical grid today, while a scathing report blamed government ties with the industry for the fukushima meltdown. we'll have the latest. >> suarez: health correspondent betty anne bowser takes a closer look at the arguments brewing over medicaid expansion and the states that want to opt out rather than take federal money. >> woodruff: we have the next in our daily download series. tonight, how politicians' use of social media can go awry. >> suarez: john merrow reports on a low income texas school district's approach to its drop-out crisis: a taste of college and hard work. >> so we're offering something that's more challenging to them, and telling them, "step up. you can have college now. it is free. it's your future. what do you want?" >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown talks to master
reform law. tonight, ray suarez looks at some important questions from americans about how it's supposed to work. >> suarez: many of the same americans who are expressing passionate pro and con opinions on the obama administration's health care reforms still are not completely sure how the complex and sprawling system created by the affordable care act will work. we didn't have time to go everywhere in america to sample questions, so we brought a newshour camera to a place americans come from everywhere to visit, the memorials, monuments, and museums of washington, d.c. to answer a sampling of questions, i'm joined by newshour regular susan dentzer. she's the editor of the journal, "health affairs." susan, we have several questions on small business and its responsibilities including this one from a man, a young fellow, who hopes to be a small business owner. >> hi, my name is roger clark. i'm from danville, virginia, a recent college graduate and aspiring future business owner. for somebody who is owning a small business, what does the new health care plan, how does that impact future b
crisis in 2010. >> woodruff: on the "daily download" tonight, ray suarez looks at facebook as it boosts its profile ahead of the november election. >> brown: and from our partners at "global post," we have the story of young chinese migrants coming to the big city in search of a new life. >> china's generation y face a group dilemma. they no longer belong in their rural hometowns, yet they don't quite fit in urban life, either. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: penn state got the full story today on a football coach's sexual abuse of boys and the subsequent
'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, prolonged power outages, record high temperatures, and wildfires made this a challenging 4th for many. we'll have the latest. >> ifill: a history making day in physics as scientists discover the god particle in switzerland. what it is and why it matters. >> suarez: we talk to dr. anthony fauci of the national institutes of health about the food and drug administration's approval of a do-it-yourself home test for h.i.v. infection. >> ifill: john merrow reports on a texas school district's approach to its high school drop-out crisis: luring students back with college courses. >> what we're looking at doing is doing education in a different way, where the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed th
. ray suarez has the story. >> football will never again be placed ahead of educating, nurturing and protecting young people. >> suarez: with that, n.c.a.a. president mark emert announced sweeping sanctions that all but leveled penn state's football program for failing to stop a pedophile ex-coach. among the measures a $60 million fine, equivalent to one year's revenue from the football program and a four-year ban on bowl games plus five years' probation. in addition, the school will for fit $13 million in bowl revenues earned by other members of the big ten conference. penn state will also be cut from 85 scholarship players to 65 for four years. and the sanctions will cancel 112 wins, going back to 1998. that's alleged when a cover-up of the scandal began. n.c.a.a. president spoke today in indianapolis. no price the n.c.a.a. can levy will repair the grievous damage inflicted by jerry sandusky on his victims. however, we can make clear that the culture, actions and inactions that allowed them to be victimized will not be tolerated in collegiate athletics. >> suarez: last month th
laws in the wake of the tragedy. >> ifill: then, ray suarez explores the fallout at penn state after the n.c.a.a. imposed fines and penalties that could cripple the school's storied football program. >> woodruff: i traveled to florida to see firsthand the challenges ahead for the obama campaign in that battleground state, ranging from the housing crisis to the health care reform law. >> now that people are really saying and saying to the president, what more can you do? what more do you have to offer now? we're still with you, but you've got to continue to do more. >> ifill: we have two reports from syria on the rebel offensive in the city of aleppo, and the aftermath of the bombardment by government forces in the capital, damascus. >> woodruff: and on the bloodiest day in iraq in two years, margaret warner talks to jane arraf in baghdad about coordinated insurgent attacks that killed more than 100 people. hoe. >> the targets are pretty much the same as they have been. they're military police, shias, ordinary people. but essentially al qaeda says it is coming back. >> ifill: that's a
: we update the battle for syria's largest city and commercial hub. and ray suarez interviews the head of refugees international about the unfolding humanitarian crisis. >> ifill: plus jeffrey brown talks with author lter dean myers about his books for young people and his mission to get more of them reading. >> the positive thing i can give them is their own presence, acknowledging them. i know where you are coming from. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: this was a day of medals and milestones for u.s. athletes at the london olympics. we take a look now at some of what went on, including marquee results from the c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 132 (some duplicates have been removed)

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